Falcons Logo
The Maltose Falcons are:
1989, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2004, 2007
CALIFORNIA HOMEBREW CLUB OF THE YEAR!

(Presented by Anchor Brewing)
2009 Mayfaire Results!
Join The Falcons Today!
Search Site


Join the
Falcons' Yahoo Group

Our Group Page

Brewing and Tasting Monthly
HWBC
22836 Ventura Blvd.
Woodland Hills, CA


Like What You See? Ready To Brew Your Own Beer?
Join The Falcons Today!

Stop by the next Club Meeting or Shop Brew to taste some great beer. New Beer Testers Always Welcome!
Home » Tech and Tips » Hops » Using and Balancing Your Hops
Using and Balancing Your Hops
by Drew Beechum

During the process of seeking comments on the Double Down Double IPA, MB made a passing comment about the percentage size of the finishing hop contribution. I'd never really given much thought to percentages of the hop additions in various parts of the boil, except getting my necessary bitterness and by feel for the rest of my additions.

The tables below show the hop schedules from the Double Down IPA and from one of the source recipes, Double Trouble. Each hop addition is listed along with columns detailing the Alpha Acid Units (AAU) and the total IBU's contributed. The columns we're focusing on are going to be the "Sum" columns in bold. Each sum column takes a group of related additions and sums their percentages. For the case of this double IPA, I've broken the recipe into a First Wort Hop group along with Bittering Hops (60-31), Flavor Hops (30-16), Aroma Hops (15-0) and Dry Hops. There are sum columns for percentages of weight, AAU's and IBU's to help us understand how much of our total hop effect we're going to see from these additions.

With the double IPA the hop character we're looking for should be both over the top (IBU-wise) and very smooth across the palate. For this kind of effect we should ideally balance the weight and the hop bitterness between the additions. We won't be able to get an even bitterness out of the aroma hops without ridiculously adding too much hop matter to the boil, but we'll try and keep the weight in the right range. The table shows that while the bitterness contribution drops in the later portions of the boil, we still maintain a consistent hopping load throughout. The overall effect should be an even seeming hop palate.

Double Down
First Wort Hopping Additions
Ounces Hop Type AA% Time Type % Weight Weight Sum AAUs AAU % AAU Sum IBUs IBU % IBU Sum
6.5 Centennial 9.1% FWH FWH 12.99%   59.15 13.79%   25.6 25.57%  
6.25 Cascade 5.9% FWH FWH 12.49% 25.47% 36.87 8.59% 22.38% 16 15.98% 41.56%

Bittering Additions
Ounces Hop Type AA% Time Type % Weight Weight Sum AAUs AAU % AAU Sum IBUs IBU % IBU Sum
3.5 Warrior 15.6% 60 BIT 6.99%   54.6 12.72%   23.9 23.88%  
2 Chinook 10.4% 60 BIT 4.00% 10.99% 20.8 4.85% 17.57% 9.1 9.09% 32.97%

Flavor Additions
Ounces Hop Type AA% Time Type % Weight Weight Sum AAUs AAU % AAU Sum IBUs IBU % IBU Sum
5.5 Amarillo 8.9% 30 FLVR 10.99%   48.95 11.41%   10.7    
6 Cascade 5.9% 30 FLVR 11.99% 22.98% 35.4 8.25% 19.66% 7.9 18.58% 18.58%

Aroma Additions
Ounces Hop Type AA% Time Type % Weight Weight Sum AAUs AAU % AAU Sum IBUs IBU % IBU Sum
4.3 Simcoe 13.7% 15 ARMA 8.59%   58.91 13.73%   6.9 6.89%  
6 Cascade 5.9% 0 ARMA 11.99% 20.58% 35.4 8.25% 21.98% 0 0.00% 6.89%

Dry Hopping Additions
Ounces Hop Type AA% Time Type % Weight Weight Sum AAUs AAU % AAU Sum IBUs IBU % IBU Sum
10 Cascade 7.9% DH DRY 19.98% 19.98% 79 18.41% 18.41% 0 0.00% 0.00%

Totals
Ounces Hop Type AA% Time Type % Weight Weight Sum AAUs AAU % AAU Sum IBUs IBU % IBU Sum
50.05         100% 100% 429.085 100.00% 100.00% 100.1 100% 100%
GRAVITY 1.085
BUGU1.18

You can expand this idea out to other styles than just your mega hop beers. Think about a smoothly hopped Pils or about a thousand other things. Odds are that you do some form of this analysis in your head when you go to make that Scotch ale, but it's probably along the lines of thinking, "Well I don't need any aroma hops in this style." Using a table like we produced here can show you things that you've missed. In the case of Double Trouble, before MB pointed it out there was a hole in the flavor hop additions and a touch too much hop in the bittering additions. By making up a table like this I was able to correct the holes by reducing the Warrior and the Chinook and adding the Amarillo addition.

Of course, I'm a geek with too much time on my hands, so maybe this isn't for you!


Want to make your own beer at home? Get started on the right foot. Check out the Falcon's sponsoring shop, The Home Beer, Wine, Cheesemaking Shop. John Daume, proprietor, has been serving the home brewing and winemaking needs of Angelenos since 1972, over 30 years! (Falcon Members receive a 10% discount on supplies)
Looking for older Falcons' information?, The Westval Maltose Falcons Webpage (Locally cached) (The Original Falcon's Roost, prior to 1999)
Looking for a home wine making club in the Los Angeles area? Check out our sister club, The Cellarmasters, over 30 and still stomping grapes.